Helping a Loved One

Hearing loss is something that can develop gradually and loved ones are often the first to notice it. When hearing loss gets in the way of someone’s ability to enjoy life, that is when a friend or relative needs to step in. It’s time to have an honest talk about hearing loss. Here are five tips to start the conversation.

The supporting role

Helping a loved one realize and get help for hearing loss is an important step in improving their quality of life and your relationship with them. When your loved one can hear you better, they will find it easier to develop a closer bond with you. You will also help them enjoy life more and improve their health.

Hearing loss is associated with cognitive decline and most people who receive treatment show marked improvements in brain health. You have an important role to play in noticing and telling your loved one about their hearing loss.

Tell them you notice

Your significant other might be thinking, "Does anyone notice that I have hearing loss?"

Let them know you do.

“I notice when you don’t hear the doorbell. And when you sit at the end of the Thanksgiving table with a confused look as everyone else laughs at a story. I notice when the TV is at full blast and the car radio is at its highest. I notice when I tell you I love you, and you tell me you love juice too. I know that it’s not your fault - and I know we can make it better."

We are here to help you and help your significant other realize that an untreated hearing loss is more noticeable than a hearing aid.

5 Tips: How to talk to a loved one about hearing loss

Talking about hearing loss with a loved one isn’t always easy. Often, people aren’t willing to admit that their hearing is less than perfect and the process of getting a hearing aid seems daunting. You can lead the way to help your loved one overcome hearing loss through action.

You have the ability to empower your loved one to take back their hearing.

Is it challenging? Yes.

Is it Worth it? Definitely.

Here are five tips for helping a loved one find a hearing loss solution:

1. Give a nudge

<p>Sometimes the best way to help someone is to guide them down the right path. Behavioral scientists call this “nudging.”
Try to point out times when your loved one probably couldn’t hear, like these:
</p>
<ul>
    <li>I really liked that piccolo solo at the concert last night, what do you think?
    </li>
    <li>Did you hear all the birds this morning? Beautiful!
    </li>
    <li>That story Tom told about his car last night at dinner was hilarious!</li>
</ul>
<p>Can you believe it?
Comments like these help set the stage for a more serious conversation about hearing loss.</p>

Sometimes the best way to help someone is to guide them down the right path. Behavioral scientists call this “nudging.” Try to point out times when your loved one probably couldn’t hear, like these:

  • I really liked that piccolo solo at the concert last night, what do you think?
  • Did you hear all the birds this morning? Beautiful!
  • That story Tom told about his car last night at dinner was hilarious!

Can you believe it? Comments like these help set the stage for a more serious conversation about hearing loss.

2. Start online

<p>A free online hearing test is a great first step toward better hearing. While results aren&rsquo;t as accurate as a full in-office hearing examination, they will give an indication of a possible problem.</p>
<span class="red-text"><a class="link-arrow" href="/en/hearing-aids/online-hearing-test">Try our Online Hearing Test here</a></span>

A free online hearing test is a great first step toward better hearing. While results aren’t as accurate as a full in-office hearing examination, they will give an indication of a possible problem.

Try our Online Hearing Test here

3. Go together

<p>Offer to get a hearing test together and follow it up with a trip to your loved one&rsquo;s favorite restaurant. This will help them feel like they're not alone, and will give comparative proof of hearing loss.</p>
<p>As a bonus, you will also get to check up on your own hearing.</p>

Offer to get a hearing test together and follow it up with a trip to your loved one’s favorite restaurant. This will help them feel like they're not alone, and will give comparative proof of hearing loss.

As a bonus, you will also get to check up on your own hearing.

4. Provide Facts

<p>Deep down, most people with untreated hearing loss know that something isn&rsquo;t right. Instead of making them feel foolish for not admitting to it, give them facts about why they need help. Here are some remarkable facts to consider:</p>
<ul>
    <li>Approximately 28.8 million U.S. adults could benefit from using hearing aids.</li>
    <li>Less than 30 percent of people over 70 who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them.</li>
    <li>2 out of 3 American adults over 65 experience hearing difficulties.</li>
    <li>Only one-half of American adults experiencing hearing difficulties actually seek professional advice from a hearing care professional.</li>
    <li>Studies have shown possible links between untreated hearing loss and cognitive decline or dementia.</li>
</ul>

Deep down, most people with untreated hearing loss know that something isn’t right. Instead of making them feel foolish for not admitting to it, give them facts about why they need help. Here are some remarkable facts to consider:

  • Approximately 28.8 million U.S. adults could benefit from using hearing aids.
  • Less than 30 percent of people over 70 who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them.
  • 2 out of 3 American adults over 65 experience hearing difficulties.
  • Only one-half of American adults experiencing hearing difficulties actually seek professional advice from a hearing care professional.
  • Studies have shown possible links between untreated hearing loss and cognitive decline or dementia.

5. Find an ambassador

<p>Do you know someone who struggled with hearing loss before getting hearing aids?</p>
<p> Encourage your loved one to meet with this person and talk about what to expect and how to get the best help possible. If you don’t know anyone, your local hearing professional can help you contact one of his or her patients.</p>

Do you know someone who struggled with hearing loss before getting hearing aids?

Encourage your loved one to meet with this person and talk about what to expect and how to get the best help possible. If you don’t know anyone, your local hearing professional can help you contact one of his or her patients.

Request a visit below or give us a call at
1-866-882-8942

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