Knowledge

Common Misconceptions About Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

Hearing loss can affect anyone regardless of age, especially when it comes to noise-Induced hearing loss. Who can be affected by it? Anyone with ears.

Whether on the job, in a roaring stadium, or because the only open spot at the concert is next to the 16ft. speaker, damage to hearing can happen anywhere. The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) have found that about 15% of people aged 20 and over have experienced noise-induced hearing loss.

You might be thinking, ‘Loud noise affects your hearing? That’s basic stuff.’ But you would be surprised at the common misconceptions about this subject:

   The Myths of Hearing Loss

Myth:

“You’d be able to tell right away if you have hearing loss.”

Truth:

While even a brief moment of dangerously high volume can cause a noticeably sharp pain to the ear, it happens far more frequently over a length of time. That cloudy sound you felt leaving the bar may have gone away the next morning, but the accumulation of moments like these and others can eventually lead to your friend suggesting it's time to get your hearing tested.

Myth:

“I might lose my hearing when I get older, but it always comes back to me after a few days.”

Truth:

As mentioned above, though it is more common over a period of time, even a one-time acute occurrence at a loud enough volume can do damage (i.e. gunshots, explosions, car crashes, concerts, etc.) *Bring earplugs to loud shows, friends*

Myth:

“That’s probably just from listening to music that's too loud.”

Truth:

The sounds you hear while on the job can do just as much damage as that extra-thumpy bass. Multiple studies have shown that the “industrial noise” we associate with big cities and construction sites is one of the leading causes over time. It can happen at work or while at play, so always be aware of your surroundings on a day-to-day basis.

Myth:

“That hearing loss probably isn’t permanent, though.”

Truth:

Depending on the extent of damage, Noise-induced hearing loss can be permanent or temporary. If you start to experience lessened or muffled hearing and have had no significant improvements after 15-17 hrs, it is very important for you to see a hearing care physician right away.

The big one...

Myth:

“We all just get old and lose our hearing. You can’t do anything to prevent it.”

Truth:

FALSE. Didn’t see that one coming, did you? Of course, you can protect yourself from the more harsh sounds of this world. If you know that you’re going to be in an environment with loud or excessive noise, bring proper ear protection. Many types of earplugs are inexpensive and will make a huge difference. Think ahead to hear better, longer.

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