Hearing Loss

11 Facts You Might Not Know About Hearing Loss

Read on to learn these interesting facts you might not have known about hearing loss. 

  1. You hear more with your brain than you do with your ears. Ears collect sounds which the brain uses to make sense of the world. around you.

  2. Over time, untreated hearing loss deprives the brain of crucial auditory information and can decrease cognitive function.

  3. Speech is one of the most difficult frequencies to process in quiet settings, even more so in public environments.

  4. Hearing loss occurs gradually over time. The person affected takes 5-7 years, on average, before they address their hearing loss.
     
  5. Hearing loss is one of the top three medical conditions for people over the age of 65, after cardiovascular disease and arthritis.

  6. People with hearing loss are more likely to have falling incidences.

  7. The outer ear never stops growing.

  8. The middle ear bones are the smallest bones in our body (they are called the malleus, incus, and stapes bones).

  9. Your ears are self-cleaning and there is no need to use a Q-tip, which can be dangerous when inserted into the ear canal.

  10. More U.S. veterans receive treatment through the VA for tinnitus and hearing loss than post-traumatic-stress-disorder.

  11. Untreated hearing loss can cause patients to lose the ability to distinguish speech in both quiet and noisy environments, which cannot be recovered. Early detection and use of hearing aids can slow the process of hearing loss.

 

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